Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT)

Roadway safety in a cooperative automated world

Highway automation is not years away, or even days away. It’s here now, causing a number of state transportation agencies to react with initiatives related to preparing and supporting Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs) on U.S. roadways.


Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT) deals with CAVs, which are vehicles capable of driving on their own with limited or no human involvement in navigation and control. Per the definition adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are six levels of automation (Levels 0-2: driver assistance and Levels 3-5: HAV), each of which requires its own specification and marketplace considerations.


Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) and Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

For traffic safety, vehicle-to-everything communications is the wireless exchange of critical safety and operational data between vehicles and anything else. The "X" could be roadway infrastructure, other vehicles, roadway workers or other safety and communication devices. ATSSA members are at the forefront of these technologies, and are working with stakeholders across new industries to see these innovations come to life.


Sensor Technology

CAVs rely on three main groups of sensors: camera, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The camera sensors capture moving objects and the outlines of roadway devices to get speed and distance data. Short- and long-range radar sensors work to detect traffic from the front and the back of CAVs. LIDAR systems produce three-dimensional images of both moving and stationary objects. 


For more information about ATSSA’s efforts on CAT and CAV’s and their interaction with our member products check out the resources below.




Resources

Pam

AASHTO issues updates to MASH guidance

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) issued an update to its guidance for the Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH) on Tuesday.

ATSSA Director of Innovation and Technical Services Eric Perry said the information addresses three additions to the Frequently Asked Questions section for MASH.

1. It clarified the truck type needed for a TL-4 test on barriers

2. It gave some guidance on selecting the Critical Impact point between 5-25 degrees for channelizer tests 90 &91.

3. It clarified that a test that is over the 2.5 mph speed tolerance on the upper end (as an example at 65 mph) is acceptable for barrier tests.

The questions and answers have been compiled since May 2018 to help with implementation of the 2016 edition of the MASH.

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