Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT)

Roadway safety in a cooperative automated world

Highway automation is not years away, or even days away. It’s here now, causing a number of state transportation agencies to react with initiatives related to preparing and supporting Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs) on U.S. roadways.


Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT) deals with CAVs, which are vehicles capable of driving on their own with limited or no human involvement in navigation and control. Per the definition adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are six levels of automation (Levels 0-2: driver assistance and Levels 3-5: HAV), each of which requires its own specification and marketplace considerations.


Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) and Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

For traffic safety, vehicle-to-everything communications is the wireless exchange of critical safety and operational data between vehicles and anything else. The "X" could be roadway infrastructure, other vehicles, roadway workers or other safety and communication devices. ATSSA members are at the forefront of these technologies, and are working with stakeholders across new industries to see these innovations come to life.


Sensor Technology

CAVs rely on three main groups of sensors: camera, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The camera sensors capture moving objects and the outlines of roadway devices to get speed and distance data. Short- and long-range radar sensors work to detect traffic from the front and the back of CAVs. LIDAR systems produce three-dimensional images of both moving and stationary objects. 


For more information about ATSSA’s efforts on CAT and CAV’s and their interaction with our member products check out the resources below.




Resources

Senate passes one-year extension of federal highway bill

Measure included in action to prevent government shutdown

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The Senate this evening approved a one-year extension of the federal highway bill, which would have expired at 12:01 a.m. on Thursday.

The extension was included in a continuing resolution (CR) passed by both chambers to avert a government shutdown. The stopgap bill pushes the deadline to pass the yearly spending budgets for the federal government to Dec. 11.

The Senate approved the action by an 84-10 vote.

NHTSA declares October 'Pedestrian Safety Month'

Goal is to encourage alertness by motorists

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Pedestrians take the forefront in October with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) holding its first “Pedestrian Safety Month,” a national educational outreach to heighten awareness for motorists and pedestrians of all ages.

The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) held a Summit on Pedestrian Safety in July during which groups representing both pedestrian and bicyclist organizations took part.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Safety offers a “focused approach” program to target specific issues including pedestrian and bicyclist safety in jurisdictions across the nation. It offers examples of programs that have undertaken changes to target this issue.

House passes stopgap funding bill including highway fund extension

Senate expected to vote ahead of Sept. 30 deadline

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The House of Representatives Tuesday night passed a stopgap funding measure that will keep the federal government fully operating beyond next Wednesday (Sept. 30). The measure included a one-year extension of the current federal highway bill that would have expired the same day.

On Monday, House Democrats offered a Continuing Resolution to extend the highway fund by one year with $10.4 billion. If approved by the Senate, the extension would be a “straight” extension of the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act, better known as the FAST Act, meaning no increase in funding to existing programs. The proposal also would include funds needed to ensure the short-term solvency of the Highway Trust Fund (HTF), with a general fund transfer of $10.4 billion to the HTF, allocated for highways.

The Senate is expected to vote next week ahead of the deadline.

Highway bill extension included in House continuing resolution today

One-year extension part of House of Representatives proposal to avoid shutdown

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Democrats in the House of Representatives today proposed a Continuing Resolution that includes a one-year extension of the current federal highway bill.

The resolution is aimed at avoiding a federal government shutdown but included the highway bill, which is scheduled to expire on Sept. 30. The federal government shutdown could come in nine days without action. The proposal would fund the government through Dec. 11.

If approved, the resolution would ensure that current transportation programs would not lapse on their expiration date of Oct. 1.

Day 2 of Legislative Briefing & Virtual Fly-In packed with activity

Dozens of meetings held with elected officials and legislative staff

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ATSSA’s annual Legislative Briefing & Fly-In wrapped up its first virtual event on Wednesday with a day full of meetings with legislators on Capitol Hill and their respective staffs.

Meetings ran from morning to evening as ATSSA members from across the country had the opportunity to deliver firsthand their priorities for the roadway safety infrastructure industry.

ATSSA’s Government Relations Team set up 54 meetings with legislative offices representing districts in Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington and Wyoming.

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