Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT)

Roadway Safety in a Cooperative Automated World

Highway automation is not years away, or even days away. It’s here now, causing a number of state transportation agencies to react with initiatives related to preparing and supporting Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs) on U.S. roadways.


Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT) deals with CAVs, which are vehicles capable of driving on their own with limited or no human involvement in navigation and control. Per the definition adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are six levels of automation (Levels 0-2: driver assistance and Levels 3-5: HAV), each of which requires its own specification and marketplace considerations.


Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) and Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

For traffic safety, vehicle-to-everything communications is the wireless exchange of critical safety and operational data between vehicles and anything else. The "X" could be roadway infrastructure, other vehicles, roadway workers or other safety and communication devices. ATSSA members are at the forefront of these technologies, and are working with stakeholders across new industries to see these innovations come to life.


Sensor Technology

CAVs rely on three main groups of sensors: camera, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The camera sensors capture moving objects and the outlines of roadway devices to get speed and distance data. Short- and long-range radar sensors work to detect traffic from the front and the back of CAVs. LIDAR systems produce three-dimensional images of both moving and stationary objects. 


For more information about ATSSA’s efforts on CAT and CAV’s and their interaction with our member products check out the resources below.




Resources

Highway automation: How ATSSA members play an important role

CAVs will need to better communicate with roadway devices and infrastructure

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Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs) rely heavily on ATSSA member products such as pavement markings, signs, and traffic control devices. These products will be an essential factor in the advancement of CAVs and critical in moving toward zero deaths on our roadways.
 

Sensor technology in roadway infrastructure

How devices are strengthening the lines of communication between human and automated drivers 

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For many departments of transportation (DOTs), the collection and sending of real-time traffic data to roadway users is high priority. One way agencies nationwide are achieving this goal is through the use of sensor technology in roadway infrastructure, such as pavement markings or signs, allowing them to strengthen Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communication. 

See the future of roadway safety infrastructure at ATSSA’s 49th Annual Convention & Traffic Expo

New Products Rollout event features latest innovative roadway safety infrastructure technology

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The future of roadway safety infrastructure innovation will be showcased at the American Traffic Safety Services Association’s (ATSSA) 49th Annual Convention & Traffic Expo, in Tampa, Florida on Feb. 8-12, 2019.

ATSSA explores importance of infrastructure for autonomous vehicles at ITS America

Session to highlight pavement markings, work zones, signage, and uses for vehicle fleet data

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Preparing Infrastructure for Automation Levels 1-3” will examine areas within roadway infrastructure that will be affected with the emergence of Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs).

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