Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT)

Roadway Safety in a Cooperative Automated World

Highway automation is not years away, or even days away. It’s here now, causing a number of state transportation agencies to react with initiatives related to preparing and supporting Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs) on U.S. roadways.


Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT) deals with CAVs, which are vehicles capable of driving on their own with limited or no human involvement in navigation and control. Per the definition adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are six levels of automation (Levels 0-2: driver assistance and Levels 3-5: HAV), each of which requires its own specification and marketplace considerations.


Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) and Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

For traffic safety, vehicle-to-everything communications is the wireless exchange of critical safety and operational data between vehicles and anything else. The "X" could be roadway infrastructure, other vehicles, roadway workers or other safety and communication devices. ATSSA members are at the forefront of these technologies, and are working with stakeholders across new industries to see these innovations come to life.


Sensor Technology

CAVs rely on three main groups of sensors: camera, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The camera sensors capture moving objects and the outlines of roadway devices to get speed and distance data. Short- and long-range radar sensors work to detect traffic from the front and the back of CAVs. LIDAR systems produce three-dimensional images of both moving and stationary objects. 


For more information about ATSSA’s efforts on CAT and CAV’s and their interaction with our member products check out the resources below.




Resources

Why Self-Driving Cars *Can't Even* With Construction Zones

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IF YOU'RE A human driver, road construction probably annoys you: one more thing clogging traffic on your way home. If you're a self-driving car, though, it can be devastating. Work zones flummox the future rulers of our roads because they override or obliterate the sturdy markers by which the vehicles are taught to navigate. With no warning, they enter a world where cones trump double yellow lines, bollards replace curbs, and construction worker hand signals outweigh traffic lights.

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) Deployment Guidance and Products

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To achieve the maximum benefit, the Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Deployment Guidance and Products requires a thorough read of this material (i.e., the “guidance”) and the full use of the associated products (i.e., the “products” in V2I Products). In addition, this document has numerous references to sources of information (see References), including relevant research articles, guidance materials, codification of general and permanent rules or laws, and pertinent websites. Some of the websites contain invaluable products that should be bookmarked or saved for future reference. The references are supplemental information that will broaden the reader’s knowledge. At the same time, they ensure this document remains concise without providing an exhaustive discussion on a given topic. Use of the guidance, products, and references can facilitate a smooth and effective V2I deployment. 

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