Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT)

Cooperative Automated Transportation

Roadway safety in a cooperative automated world

Highway automation is not years away, or even days away. It’s here now, causing a number of state transportation agencies to react with initiatives related to preparing and supporting Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs) on U.S. roadways.


Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT) deals with CAVs, which are vehicles capable of driving on their own with limited or no human involvement in navigation and control. Per the definition adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are six levels of automation (Levels 0-2: driver assistance and Levels 3-5: HAV), each of which requires its own specification and marketplace considerations.


Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) and Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

For traffic safety, vehicle-to-everything communications is the wireless exchange of critical safety and operational data between vehicles and anything else. The "X" could be roadway infrastructure, other vehicles, roadway workers or other safety and communication devices. ATSSA members are at the forefront of these technologies, and are working with stakeholders across new industries to see these innovations come to life.


Sensor Technology

CAVs rely on three main groups of sensors: camera, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The camera sensors capture moving objects and the outlines of roadway devices to get speed and distance data. Short- and long-range radar sensors work to detect traffic from the front and the back of CAVs. LIDAR systems produce three-dimensional images of both moving and stationary objects.


For more information about ATSSA’s efforts on CAT and CAV’s and their interaction with our member products check out the resources below.




Resources

Pam
/ Categories: Advocacy

ATSSA Town Hall covers anticipated impacts of 2020 election

Listen now to a recording of Tuesday's Town Hall

UPDATE: A recording of the ATSSA Town Hall is now available.

ATSSA Vice President of Government Relations Nate Smith noted that congressional races didn’t go as expected in this month’s election, with Republicans picking up seats while the Democrats could lose up to a dozen when final results are tabulated.

The current count is 219 seats for the Democrats, 207 for Republicans and nine yet to be called.

Smith also predicted Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will be the next Transportation Secretary if Vice President Joe Biden wins when results of the presidential race are final. Smith laid out six contenders for the cabinet position.

In a nearly 1-hour Town Hall this afternoon, Smith said congressional races will result in a significant change in the makeup of the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee due to seven to 10 losses or retirements. But he noted that’s not bad for ATSSA’s membership because of the committee’s role in infrastructure, which produces jobs and saves lives, two benefits for committee members to tout.

Smith said it could be January or February before it’s clear who will serve on the committee. Whoever it is, it will be important for ATSSA members in those congressional districts to approach their representatives early.

“It makes a difference in winning your argument,” Smith said.

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