Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT)

Cooperative Automated Transportation

Roadway safety in a cooperative automated world

Highway automation is not years away, or even days away. It’s here now, causing a number of state transportation agencies to react with initiatives related to preparing and supporting Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs) on U.S. roadways.


Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT) deals with CAVs, which are vehicles capable of driving on their own with limited or no human involvement in navigation and control. Per the definition adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are six levels of automation (Levels 0-2: driver assistance and Levels 3-5: HAV), each of which requires its own specification and marketplace considerations.


Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) and Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

For traffic safety, vehicle-to-everything communications is the wireless exchange of critical safety and operational data between vehicles and anything else. The "X" could be roadway infrastructure, other vehicles, roadway workers or other safety and communication devices. ATSSA members are at the forefront of these technologies, and are working with stakeholders across new industries to see these innovations come to life.


Sensor Technology

CAVs rely on three main groups of sensors: camera, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The camera sensors capture moving objects and the outlines of roadway devices to get speed and distance data. Short- and long-range radar sensors work to detect traffic from the front and the back of CAVs. LIDAR systems produce three-dimensional images of both moving and stationary objects.


For more information about ATSSA’s efforts on CAT and CAV’s and their interaction with our member products check out the resources below.




Resources

Students encouraged to apply for Roadway Worker Memorial Scholarships

Applications due by Feb. 15 for 2023-24 academic year

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Roadway Worker Memorial Scholarships can fuel the journey to dreams fulfilled for students who lost a parent or had one permanently disabled due to a work zone incident.

The ATSS Foundation offers two scholarships for the loved ones following a work zone tragedy.

The Roadway Worker Memorial Scholarship Program offers dependents of the workers—both children and spouses—an opportunity to continue pursuing their academic dreams beyond high school. This competitive program offers up to $10,000 for an academic year. Applicants who demonstrate a strong commitment to volunteerism may be eligible to receive an additional $1,000 in honor of Chuck Bailey, who was an esteemed member of the roadway safety industry.

Applications are due by Feb. 15 for the 2023-24 academic year.

ATSS Foundation awards Roadway Worker Memorial Scholarships to 14 students

Two students receive Chuck Bailey Memorial Scholarships for volunteerism

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FREDERICKSBURG, Va. (Dec. 14, 2022) –The American Traffic Safety Services Foundation awarded scholarships to 14 students for the 2022-23 academic year, with the majority of students being multi-year recipients.

The Roadway Worker Memorial Scholarship Program started in 2002 to provide financial assistance for post-high school education to dependents of roadway workers killed or permanently disabled in roadway work zones. The program is competitive and provides scholarships valued up to $10,000 per student each year. The program has awarded more than $400,000 since its inception.

Applicants who demonstrate a strong commitment to volunteerism may be eligible for an additional $1,000 in honor of Chuck Bailey, a member of the roadway safety industry who died in 2002.

Donors give ATSS Foundation record-breaking Giving Tuesday

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Giving Tuesday donations resulted in more than $12,800 for The ATSS Foundation, the largest amount ever received by the nonprofit on this global day of philanthropy.

The Georgia ATSSA Chapter (GA-ATSSA) got things rolling by offering $5,000 in matching funds. Then 31 individuals and businesses rose to the challenge, giving $7,851.

“We are overwhelmed by the generosity shown by our supporters, including the Georgia Chapter of ATSSA by providing its $5,000 match,” said Foundation Director Lori Diaz. “Yesterday’s record-breaking total demonstrates the heart of our members who back The Foundation and its efforts to spread awareness of the importance of work zone safety and to assist families whose lives are forever changed by a work zone tragedy.”

ONLINE NOW: Phoenix offers a glimpse into the AV future

Fall issue of Roadway Safety magazine includes supplement on Worker Protection

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When ATSSA members arrive in Phoenix for the 2023 Convention & Traffic Expo in February they will find themselves in a city that’s made a name for itself as a pioneer in the testing of autonomous vehicle (AV) technologies. The region has embraced the technology and seen multiple pilots for grocery delivery as well as a driverless taxi service.

The Fall issue of Roadway Safety magazine—available online now—details these efforts in Arizona and reveals a resource for members to remove the fear factor from contract negotiations, offers members’ take on the value of in-person advocacy and explains how ATSSA’s ITS Team keeps pace with innovation.

An entire supplement is devoted to roadway worker protection and spells out efforts underway to improve worker safety from multiple perspectives.

Both issues are online now.

Midyear Meeting starts Tuesday in Rhode Island

General session will address ongoing supply chain challenges

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ATSSA’s Midyear Meeting kicks off on Tuesday, launching the annual collaboration of industry insiders gathered to address the latest innovations and challenges in the roadway safety infrastructure industry.

This year’s event takes place in Providence, R.I., where Wednesday’s agenda includes a panel discussion on workforce, materials and supply chain issues.

“Construction and transportation industry challenges – potholes on the industry highway” will be moderated by ATSSA Vice President of Engagement Nate Smith. Panelists include Kate Fox Wood, senior director of government relations with the Association of Equipment Manufacturers, Jonathan Starks of FTR, who is a longtime member of the freight industry, and Sterling Wiggins with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The 1-hour session starts at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday and will focus on the state of affairs across the construction and transportation industries and what the path forward may look like.

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