Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT)

Cooperative Automated Transportation

Roadway safety in a cooperative automated world

Highway automation is not years away, or even days away. It’s here now, causing a number of state transportation agencies to react with initiatives related to preparing and supporting Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs) on U.S. roadways.


Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT) deals with CAVs, which are vehicles capable of driving on their own with limited or no human involvement in navigation and control. Per the definition adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are six levels of automation (Levels 0-2: driver assistance and Levels 3-5: HAV), each of which requires its own specification and marketplace considerations.


Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) and Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

For traffic safety, vehicle-to-everything communications is the wireless exchange of critical safety and operational data between vehicles and anything else. The "X" could be roadway infrastructure, other vehicles, roadway workers or other safety and communication devices. ATSSA members are at the forefront of these technologies, and are working with stakeholders across new industries to see these innovations come to life.


Sensor Technology

CAVs rely on three main groups of sensors: camera, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The camera sensors capture moving objects and the outlines of roadway devices to get speed and distance data. Short- and long-range radar sensors work to detect traffic from the front and the back of CAVs. LIDAR systems produce three-dimensional images of both moving and stationary objects.


For more information about ATSSA’s efforts on CAT and CAV’s and their interaction with our member products check out the resources below.




Resources

Become familiar with ‘scope of work’ and indemnity in contract agreements

Understanding those terms can limit liability

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Subcontractors may be unaware they can review and negotiate subcontracts before signing them.

Negotiating can be as simple as "red lining" words to delete from the document or adding words or sentences.

Two important items that should be thoroughly reviewed before signing any subcontract agreement are the “scope of work” and “indemnification” clauses. The scope of work should be clearly defined and is usually one of the first paragraphs of the subcontract. 

Indemnity is a contractual obligation of one party to compensate for the loss incurred by another party due to the acts of a third party or one's own actions.

‘Creating a Safety Culture’ webinar set for Sept. 13

Gain tips for getting everyone on board with workplace safety

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Avoiding workplace injuries isn’t just good for your team, it’s good for the bottom line. But how do you get everyone—at every level—enthused and attentive to the task?

Join ATSSA’s free webinar on “Creating a Safety Culture” on Sept. 13 to gain insights for implementing a culture shift. Speaker Alex Kelly, CEO of SALT and Company, will discuss how to blend industry best practices and behavioral psychology to support behavior change. Prior to starting SALT, Kelly directed Canada’s first Vision Zero Advocate Institute, which is dedicated to supporting municipalities and businesses in the adoption of evidence-based road safety programming.

Registration is now open for this safety culture strategy session.

This is the fourth of five Worker Safety Webinars hosted by ATSSA’s Training Department and the Roadway Worker Protection Council.

Midyear Meeting starts Tuesday in Rhode Island

General session will address ongoing supply chain challenges

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ATSSA’s Midyear Meeting kicks off on Tuesday, launching the annual collaboration of industry insiders gathered to address the latest innovations and challenges in the roadway safety infrastructure industry.

This year’s event takes place in Providence, R.I., where Wednesday’s agenda includes a panel discussion on workforce, materials and supply chain issues.

“Construction and transportation industry challenges – potholes on the industry highway” will be moderated by ATSSA Vice President of Engagement Nate Smith. Panelists include Kate Fox Wood, senior director of government relations with the Association of Equipment Manufacturers, Jonathan Starks of FTR, who is a longtime member of the freight industry, and Sterling Wiggins with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The 1-hour session starts at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday and will focus on the state of affairs across the construction and transportation industries and what the path forward may look like.

Apply for ATSSA’s New Products Rollout and Innovation Awards

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Apply by Dec. 1 to participate in ATSSA’s New Products Rollout (NPRO), which will be held during ATSSA’s 53rd Annual Convention & Traffic Expo in Phoenix, Feb. 17-21.

Exhibitors who introduced products after Jan. 1, 2020, are eligible to apply.

Entries accepted for NPRO will be included in the New Products Listing, which showcases the products to the roughly 3,700 roadway safety professionals who attend ATSSA’S Annual Convention & Traffic Expo, including listing on the Convention website and mobile app.

Innovation Awards are chosen from among the products selected for NPRO.

Help teen drivers safely navigate work zones

Free Aug. 9 webinar explains how to start a program in your state

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The ATSS Foundation is partnering with Work Zone Safe to teach teen drivers how to safely navigate roadway work zones.

The online program is currently only available to teens who live in Oklahoma but could be expanded to other states.

Learn about the program and how to bring it to your state during a free webinar, "No More Pamphlets! Modernizing Teen Driver Work Zone Safety," on Aug. 9, 2-3 p.m. ATSSA members and representatives from departments of transportation (DOTs) are encouraged to attend.

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