Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT)

Cooperative Automated Transportation

Roadway safety in a cooperative automated world

Highway automation is not years away, or even days away. It’s here now, causing a number of state transportation agencies to react with initiatives related to preparing and supporting Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs) on U.S. roadways.


Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

Cooperative Automated Transportation (CAT) deals with CAVs, which are vehicles capable of driving on their own with limited or no human involvement in navigation and control. Per the definition adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there are six levels of automation (Levels 0-2: driver assistance and Levels 3-5: HAV), each of which requires its own specification and marketplace considerations.


Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) and Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs)

For traffic safety, vehicle-to-everything communications is the wireless exchange of critical safety and operational data between vehicles and anything else. The "X" could be roadway infrastructure, other vehicles, roadway workers or other safety and communication devices. ATSSA members are at the forefront of these technologies, and are working with stakeholders across new industries to see these innovations come to life.


Sensor Technology

CAVs rely on three main groups of sensors: camera, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The camera sensors capture moving objects and the outlines of roadway devices to get speed and distance data. Short- and long-range radar sensors work to detect traffic from the front and the back of CAVs. LIDAR systems produce three-dimensional images of both moving and stationary objects.


For more information about ATSSA’s efforts on CAT and CAV’s and their interaction with our member products check out the resources below.




Resources

Roadway Safety Spring Issue and Convention Extra now online

Explore Ohio’s smart mobility corridor and relive highlights of the 2022 Convention in Tampa

The Spring Issue of Roadway Safety magazine is online now and explores Ohio’s Smart Mobility Corridor along Interstate 33 between Dublin and East Liberty.

This 35-mile stretch of roadway in Northeast Ohio is a living laboratory where multiple organizations are testing automated and connected vehicle technology including ways to protect pedestrians. The project is a partnership between private industry and government entities as well as residents in those communities who participate as they go about everyday tasks including commuting to work.

Honda Research Institute USA is one of those partners and Chief Engineer Sue Bai has dubbed it “the world’s most connected highway.”

Check out all the details of this innovative project as well as other features in the Spring Issue including:

  • Progress of the Roadway Worker Protection Council
  • Groundwork for the Women in Roadway Safety Council
  • CV2X efforts in Georgia
  • Work Zone Data Exchange advances.

Convention Extra is also online and provides a commemorative of the 2022 Convention & Traffic Expo in Tampa, Fla.

Relive the fun of this roadway safety reunion, find out if we captured you in one of the many photos and celebrate the winners of national awards.

Check out photos from the 30th Annual Golf Classic Tournament and the 9th Annual Sporting Clays event and learn more about two of The ATSS Foundation’s Roadway Worker Memorial Scholarship recipients and their families.

Plus, discover how many countries were represented at this year’s Convention.

Then start planning for the 2023 Convention & Traffic Expo, Feb. 17-21 in Phoenix—where roadway safety and innovation intersect.

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