Pavement Marking

Pavement Marking

Pavement Marking

In a report developed by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), it was recommended that the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) establish plans to “better manage” initiatives and efforts related to Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs). GAO officials state within the report, which was released in November 2017, that their reasoning behind the research efforts are based on the potential promise of CAVs to provide transformative safety and mobility benefits, but these benefits also will come with a set of safety and infrastructure challenges for policymakers.


While it also was noted that other components such as urban versus rural settings and local ownership of roadways will play a hand in infrastructure adaptations, many experts in automation and infrastructure back up the report’s claims, and assert that consistent and proper maintenance of the current roadway system is of the upmost importance for conventional and AV motorists — especially when it comes to pavement markings.


ATSSA has a dedicated group of members on its Pavement Marking Committee (member login required), who are working to assert the proper maintenance of pavement marking and advance technologies being developed to help increase safety benefits and accommodation of CAVs. The committee has developed a list of policies and continues to work toward advancing the collaboration between the roadway safety industry and automakers as America progresses toward an automated future.

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FCC extends deadline for replies to comments on 5.9 GHz band proposal

The Federal Communications Commission’s Office of Engineering and Technology granted a 21-day extension of the deadline for submitting replies to comments regarding a proposed rule change regarding the 5.9 GHz band.

The new deadline is April 27.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced the proposal to reallocate a portion of the 5.9 GHz band - also commonly referred to as the "safety spectrum" - to other uses, including WiFi at a Nov. 20 meeting.

Organizations had until March 9 to file responses to the proposal. They then originally had until April 6 to file responses to the comments.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) and the Intelligent Transportation Society of America (ITS America) on March 20 both requested a 90-day extension of the reply comment filing date.

AASHTO and ITSA sought the extension because of the “extensive record generated by the comments in the midst of the disruptions necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic,” according to the statement issued by the Office of Engineering and Technology with its decision.

The office noted that extensions aren’t “routinely granted” but did so under the circumstances and “to develop the record to the fullest extent possible in this proceeding.”

The FCC’s five-member commission voted unanimously on Dec. 12 to “take a fresh and comprehensive look at the 5.9 GHz (5.850-5.925 GHz) band, proposing rule changes to ensure that this spectrum supports its highest and best use for the American people,” according to an FCC press release. The proposal is to reallocate a portion of the band to uses such as WiFi.

ATSSA filed its response in opposition to the FCC proposal on March 2, saying it was “steadfastly opposed” to the changes.

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