Pavement Marking

Pavement Marking

Pavement Marking

In a report developed by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), it was recommended that the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) establish plans to “better manage” initiatives and efforts related to Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs). GAO officials state within the report, which was released in November 2017, that their reasoning behind the research efforts are based on the potential promise of CAVs to provide transformative safety and mobility benefits, but these benefits also will come with a set of safety and infrastructure challenges for policymakers.


While it also was noted that other components such as urban versus rural settings and local ownership of roadways will play a hand in infrastructure adaptations, many experts in automation and infrastructure back up the report’s claims, and assert that consistent and proper maintenance of the current roadway system is of the upmost importance for conventional and AV motorists — especially when it comes to pavement markings.


ATSSA has a dedicated group of members on its Pavement Marking Committee (member login required), who are working to assert the proper maintenance of pavement marking and advance technologies being developed to help increase safety benefits and accommodation of CAVs. The committee has developed a list of policies and continues to work toward advancing the collaboration between the roadway safety industry and automakers as America progresses toward an automated future.

Resources

Midyear Meeting starts Tuesday in Rhode Island

General session will address ongoing supply chain challenges

ATSSA’s Midyear Meeting kicks off on Tuesday, launching the annual collaboration of industry insiders gathered to address the latest innovations and challenges in the roadway safety infrastructure industry.

This year’s event takes place in Providence, R.I., where Wednesday’s agenda includes a panel discussion on workforce, materials and supply chain issues.

“Construction and transportation industry challenges – potholes on the industry highway” will be moderated by ATSSA Vice President of Engagement Nate Smith. Panelists include Kate Fox Wood, senior director of government relations with the Association of Equipment Manufacturers, Jonathan Starks of FTR, who is a longtime member of the freight industry, and Sterling Wiggins with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The 1-hour session starts at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday and will focus on the state of affairs across the construction and transportation industries and what the path forward may look like.

Registration is still open for the Midyear Meeting, which runs through Friday.

This year’s event takes place at the Omni Providence Hotel. An ATSS Foundation fundraiser on Wednesday evening is hosted by the New England ATSSA Chapter and will be held at the historic Squantum Association, where participants will enjoy a classic New England style dinner and entertainment by Stone Shakers, winner of ATSSA’s Battle of the Bands contest.

More than 350 participants are expected for Midyear, which is held to advance roadway safety through a laser-like focus on key areas facing the industry. The four-day schedule includes council and committee meetings to address each area of the industry from pavement markings to guardrails, signs, signals, safety, innovations, temporary traffic control, high friction surface treatment, strategic highway safety plans, work zone intelligent transportation systems (ITS) and government relations. Plus, the newest councils—Roadway Worker Protection and Women in Roadway Safety—will continue making headway on their missions.

Join the action at this year’s Midyear Meeting and add the 2023 meeting to your calendar now. The 2023 Midyear Meeting will be held Aug. 15-18 at the Loews Chicago O’Hare Hotel.

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