Temporary Traffic Control

Temporary Traffic Control

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Roadway crashes are a result of three primary contributing factors: human behavior, the roadway itself and the vehicle. A combination of any or all of these factors may lead to a crash or increase the severity of a crash. However, research proves that the greatest potential to improve roadway safety is by a comprehensive approach that includes enforcement, education, emergency response and engineering infrastructure safety countermeasures.


Engineering countermeasures are roadway and infrastructure improvements implemented directly to the roadway network. Countermeasures (also known as strategies) include rumble strips, highly reflective signs and pavement markings, roadside hardware devices (guardrail and cable median barrier), traffic control devices and other geometric improvements. These strategies can actually mitigate against behavior-related crashes by alerting drivers of an upcoming change in the driving environment that requires action or by providing positive guidance to prevent a collision. Countermeasures can minimize the consequences of a driver action that causes a vehicle to depart the roadway or collide with another conflicting vehicle.


ATSSA's Temporary Traffic Control Committee (member login required) works to promote the significance of these temporary traffic control devices and how they impact the roadway safety industry. Committee members focus on federal advocacy, work with ATSSA chapters and members to develop and deliver government relations services and provide general education on roadway safety infrastructure. The committee also fosters knowledge exchange at all ATSSA venues and works to increase the number of members and/or companies participating in ATSSA programs and events.

Resources

ATSSA Town Hall on Buy America guidelines set for Sept. 7

Virtual event will offer insights to help members prepare for enactment

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Get ready for enactment of the new Build America, Buy America Act (BABA) guidelines by attending ATSSA’s free virtual Town Hall on Sept. 7.

Speakers will address questions on the recently released guidance for the Build America, Buy America Act (BABA).

The virtual Town Hall panel will include ATSSA Director of Federal Government Relations Cameron Greene and Kathy Ruffalo, president of Ruffalo & Associates, a Washington-based advocacy and consulting firm. Ruffalo has significant transportation and infrastructure experience at both the federal and state levels.

Registration is now open.

Final ‘Buy America’ guideline published, starting 60-day clock to enactment

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The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on Wednesday published the final guideline for the Build America, Buy America Act, starting a 60-day countdown to its enactment.

Included in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), this expansion of the Buy America program led to the inclusion of a number of materials and products used and manufactured by ATSSA members.

ATSSA’s Government Relations Team provides a summary of the most important sections of the 162-page guidance and will continue to update ATSSA members as more information becomes available. ATSSA also will be holding a virtual town hall on this topic on Sept. 7.

Final guidance issued on ‘Buy America’ policy

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The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has released the final guidance related to the Build America, Buy America Act provisions of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA). 

This final guidance includes comparisons to the initial guidance from OMB from April of 2022 and responses to comments submitted to the OMB Request for Information from earlier this year. The IIJA expanded current Buy America requirements for infrastructure projects, including the addition of construction materials as a covered category.  

The final OMB guidance directly responds to specific concerns raised by ATSSA.

TRIP report estimates $1.9 trillion in societal harm from fatal and serious traffic crashes in 2022

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TRIP, a national transportation research nonprofit, this morning released a report showing that the high number of traffic fatalities and serious-injury crashes over the past three years took a significant toll on the nation in both lives lost and economic costs.

Utilizing data from a 2023 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) report, TRIP estimated that fatal and serious traffic crashes in the U.S. in 2022 caused a total of $1.9 trillion in “societal harm,” including $465 billion in economic costs and $1.4 trillion in quality-of-life costs.

 

House committee releases draft of FAA reauthorization bill

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The House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee today released its draft reauthorization bill for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

The bipartisan Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act would reauthorize the FAA aviation infrastructure and safety programs for the next five fiscal years, with a total investment of around $103 billion over the lifespan of the bill.

At ATSSA’s Annual Convention & Traffic Expo in February, the Government Relations Committee approved a policy allowing for the Association to get engaged with this reauthorization, with a specific focus on increased investment on airfield and curbside infrastructure. The bill released earlier today would provide $20 billion in grant funding for the Airport Improvement Program (AIP). The AIP is the main grant program responsible for funding airfield and access road focused infrastructure safety projects. The full list of AIP eligible projects is available online.

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